LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Talk about this week's LRRcast and what you'd like to see in future ones.
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Graham
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LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby Graham » 13 Oct 2015, 12:14

Join Paul, Cameron and Alex this week as they discuss workplace blunders. Not here of course, safety is our number 4 priority here at LoadingReadyRun.
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby DaMage » 13 Oct 2015, 21:59

I was really surprised when Paul didn't know what Bitumen was, it must be a regional thing. In this part of Australia the road is commonly referred to as 'The bitumen', so it's in the common vocabulary, I thought it was more widespread then just here.
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby Master Gunner » 14 Oct 2015, 04:32

"Asphalt", "pitch", and "tar" are far more common terms for it in North America (depending on context). The word Bitumen isn't unknown, but mostly it's something we're vaguely aware exists but don't know the proper context for.
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby Marcvs Avrelivs » 14 Oct 2015, 08:21

We mostly know bitumen here in North America from all the times it seems to spill (like Nexen's spill in Fort McMurray this summer).
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby Scud422 » 14 Oct 2015, 10:20

It looks like a comment from Cam was cut @5:40
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby Gamercow » 14 Oct 2015, 12:02

I have so many different stories of workplace mishaps, including:
- The time I found out that many carnival workers are paid in drugs.
- The time I had hydrochloric acid poured on my ankle
- The time the guy I work with got a screwdriver THROUGH his had
- The time I clipped the tendon between my index finger and thumb with really sharp wire cutters
- The time I saw a co-worker get 30 amps across his body and shoot 8 feet across the room
- The time the guy's hand melted to the toner cartridge
- The time I almost put my eye out with a jagged metal pipe

None of those are as good as my old professor who worked for Dow Chemicals, and saw a dude get his head taken off by a gas cylinder that lost its nozzle and became a missile.
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby Seirhune » 15 Oct 2015, 04:16

Yep, bitumen certainly isn't in the common vernacular here in the States.

Workplace accidents are certainly an evergreen topic. Back in college, I interned at a research lab attached to a food processing factory and inadvertently prevented what probably would have been a bit of a disaster.

Ethanol was used a lot in the various processes at the plant, you see. And every day I would have to go get samples from various tanks in the plant to bring back and test. I'd go grab the floor engineer and we'd go get what I'd need, and with big tanks full of alcohol you can imagine that the air could be quite potent.

One day though, my lungs were on fire at the usual tanks. The alcohol burn was insane and I had to keep diving outside because it was so bad. I felt like a right proper wuss. At least until one of the senior chemical engineers came into the lab and handed me a bit of paper which documented my reaction as part of the reason they checked one of those tanks and found that its vents had been clogged. The pressure was apparently so great that when it was unclogged part of the tank (the large multi-story steel tank) popped back into proper shape.

The normal workers on the floor didn't notice because they work there every day and are used to the fumes. I apparently was the canary and saved the day by being a right proper wuss!

One Irish engineer who was visiting told a story about a fellow who got decapitated by an industrial centrifuge that came apart while spinning. Apparently it went through at least a wall or two of concrete before stopping. *shudder*

Do not trifle with industrial machinery, kids!
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby Master Gunner » 15 Oct 2015, 08:24

Industrial centrifuges are one of the scariest machines I know of.
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby mutant_pie » 15 Oct 2015, 09:25

Good podcast on what (someone else noted) is an evergreen topic. To Alex, regarding table saws. It's good to have a healthy respect for them. I don't know if you realize this, but on modern ones there is a circuit that if any part of your body contacts the blade, the motor shuts off and an eletro-mechanical brake stops the blade in a fraction of a second.

Once I was fully trained and experienced with a table saw, I still had healthy respect for it, but no fear. What I learned to be afraid of while fabricating plastic items on one is the final cut edges of the material. On a piece of plastic (like acrylic or even ABS) you can end up with a razor sharp edge. After I sliced open my hands and arms a couple of times (sometimes THROUGH workgloves) I kept a deburring tool at hand to break the sharpness of the edges.
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby HalfBadger » 21 Oct 2015, 09:03

I'm surprised Cam didn't correct Alex, when Alex said he wanted to pull all his limbs into a sphere. The 3 dimensional object would be a ball. A sphere is the surface of ball. It isn't really a 3 dimensional object.
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby My pseudonym is Ix » 21 Oct 2015, 13:18

HalfBadger... I've gotta say I disagree with you there. Saying a sphere is a surface of a ball is a bit like saying that a circle is only the 'surface' of a disc, and is really a line rather than a two dimensional shape. In mathematical terminology, it simply isn't thought of that way; if you want to talk about surfaces only, you would generally specify a 'spherical surface'
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Re: LRRcast - Workplace Accidents

Postby UnarmedOracle » 25 Oct 2015, 08:25

I wouldn't correct Alex on the sphere/ball thing because it doesn't impede my understanding of his statement. It's a distinction that is meaningful in a few small applications and for almost every other the two terms, while distinct, clearly community the same message.
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